Teaching New Words to Children With Specific Language Impairment Using Interactive Book Reading This article will review the evidence base for interactive book reading to facilitate new word learning for preschool and school age children. Methods from an ongoing clinical trial of interactive book reading will be described to illustrate how this treatment approach can be delivered at a high intensity to children ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2015
Teaching New Words to Children With Specific Language Impairment Using Interactive Book Reading
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krista Voelmle
    Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Holly L. Storkel
    Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Financial Disclosure: Krista Voelmle is a master's student and doctoral candidate at the University of Kansas. Holly L. Storkel is professor and chair at the University of Kansas. The authors received salary support from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC012824) to support completion of the research reported in this article.
    Financial Disclosure: Krista Voelmle is a master's student and doctoral candidate at the University of Kansas. Holly L. Storkel is professor and chair at the University of Kansas. The authors received salary support from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC012824) to support completion of the research reported in this article.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Krista Voelmle has previously published in the subject area. Holly L. Storkel has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Krista Voelmle has previously published in the subject area. Holly L. Storkel has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2015
Teaching New Words to Children With Specific Language Impairment Using Interactive Book Reading
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, November 2015, Vol. 22, 131-137. doi:10.1044/lle22.4.131
History: Received May 20, 2015 , Revised July 21, 2015 , Accepted August 24, 2015
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, November 2015, Vol. 22, 131-137. doi:10.1044/lle22.4.131
History: Received May 20, 2015; Revised July 21, 2015; Accepted August 24, 2015

This article will review the evidence base for interactive book reading to facilitate new word learning for preschool and school age children. Methods from an ongoing clinical trial of interactive book reading will be described to illustrate how this treatment approach can be delivered at a high intensity to children with specific language impairment (SLI). Preliminary results from this clinical trial indicate that children with SLI need a modified intensity that is three times higher than their same-age peers.

Acknowledgements
The data described here are from an ongoing clinical trial supported by Grant DC 012824 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. We thank the children and their families who participated in this research. We also thank the SLPs, the school directors, and the teachers for their involvement and support. Finally, we thank the staff of the KAW Story Project for their assistance with participant recruitment, data collection, and data processing.
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