From Research to Reality: Use of literacy-based targets in Speech-Language Therapy and Special Education Classrooms Children with language impairment (LI) are at substantial risk for short and long term delays in reading development. This fact is neither surprising nor new information, as language and literacy skills have been shown to be highly correlated. Empirical evidence suggests that literacy interventions are effective in boosting the reading ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2015
From Research to Reality: Use of literacy-based targets in Speech-Language Therapy and Special Education Classrooms
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Beth Schmitt
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX
  • Sherine Tambyraja
    Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • Financial Disclosure: Mary Beth Schmitt is assistant professor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Sherine Tambyraja is as senior research associate at Ohio State University.
    Financial Disclosure: Mary Beth Schmitt is assistant professor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Sherine Tambyraja is as senior research associate at Ohio State University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Mary Beth Schmitt has previously published in the subject area. Sherine Tambyraja has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Mary Beth Schmitt has previously published in the subject area. Sherine Tambyraja has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2015
From Research to Reality: Use of literacy-based targets in Speech-Language Therapy and Special Education Classrooms
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2015, Vol. 22, 103-109. doi:10.1044/lle22.3.103
History: Received February 17, 2015 , Revised April 16, 2015 , Accepted April 28, 2015
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2015, Vol. 22, 103-109. doi:10.1044/lle22.3.103
History: Received February 17, 2015; Revised April 16, 2015; Accepted April 28, 2015

Children with language impairment (LI) are at substantial risk for short and long term delays in reading development. This fact is neither surprising nor new information, as language and literacy skills have been shown to be highly correlated. Empirical evidence suggests that literacy interventions are effective in boosting the reading outcomes of children with LI; however, research into business-as-usual practices in the public schools suggests that children with LI receive very little time devoted to literacy-based instruction, including speech-therapy and special education classrooms. This article discusses the connection between oral language and literacy for children with LI, federal mandates that guide intervention, and current research regarding provision of literacy intervention for children with LI.

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