Co-Speech Gesture Input as a Support for Language Learning in Children With and Without Early Language Delay The current paper provides empirical support for adults using co-speech gesturing with children with and without early language delay. The discussion starts broad by showing that co-speech gestures are already in the child's language environment. We then show that encouraging co-speech gesturing by adults promotes language development and use in ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2015
Co-Speech Gesture Input as a Support for Language Learning in Children With and Without Early Language Delay
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Capone Singleton
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
  • Jessica Saks
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
  • Financial Disclosure: Nina Capone Singleton is an associate professor at Seton Hall University. Jessica Saks is graduate student at Seton Hall University. Gratitude is extended to the ASHA Foundation for a grant awarded to the first author.
    Financial Disclosure: Nina Capone Singleton is an associate professor at Seton Hall University. Jessica Saks is graduate student at Seton Hall University. Gratitude is extended to the ASHA Foundation for a grant awarded to the first author.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Nina Capone Singleton has previously published in the subject area. Jessica Saks has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Nina Capone Singleton has previously published in the subject area. Jessica Saks has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2015
Co-Speech Gesture Input as a Support for Language Learning in Children With and Without Early Language Delay
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2015, Vol. 22, 61-71. doi:10.1044/lle22.2.61
History: Received November 2, 2014 , Revised December 29, 2014 , Accepted January 5, 2015
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2015, Vol. 22, 61-71. doi:10.1044/lle22.2.61
History: Received November 2, 2014; Revised December 29, 2014; Accepted January 5, 2015

The current paper provides empirical support for adults using co-speech gesturing with children with and without early language delay. The discussion starts broad by showing that co-speech gestures are already in the child's language environment. We then show that encouraging co-speech gesturing by adults promotes language development and use in children. The discussion is then narrowed to the review of the finer aspects of word learning which sets the stage for how iconic gestures can be utilized in language therapy. Finally, we show that pairing iconic gestures with word models promotes word learning.

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