Enhancing Engagement in the Classroom for Students with ASD Engagement is important for development and learning, and an area of need for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Experts recommend that children with ASD should be actively engaged for at least 25 hours per week in effective interventions (National Research Council [NRC], 2001). There is a growing body of ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2015
Enhancing Engagement in the Classroom for Students with ASD
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Dykstra Steinbrenner
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Financial Disclosure: Jessica Dykstra Steinbrenner is an investigator at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Financial Disclosure: Jessica Dykstra Steinbrenner is an investigator at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jessica Dykstra Steinbrenner has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jessica Dykstra Steinbrenner has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2015
Enhancing Engagement in the Classroom for Students with ASD
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2015, Vol. 22, 22-30. doi:10.1044/lle22.1.22
History: Received September 1, 2014 , Accepted November 17, 2014 , Revised November 19, 2014
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2015, Vol. 22, 22-30. doi:10.1044/lle22.1.22
History: Received September 1, 2014; Accepted November 17, 2014; Revised November 19, 2014

Engagement is important for development and learning, and an area of need for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Experts recommend that children with ASD should be actively engaged for at least 25 hours per week in effective interventions (National Research Council [NRC], 2001). There is a growing body of evidence-based practices and strategies that can be used in classroom settings to support the engagement of students with ASD, including instructional arrangements, instructional strategies, and adult interaction behaviors. This article will provide a summary of evidence-based practices that can be used with students with ASD in school settings.

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