Joining Clauses with Subordinate Conjunctions: One Type of Complex Syntax The purpose of this article is to enhance clinicians' knowledge and skills about one complex syntax type, subordinate conjunction clauses. Children's complex syntax skills are critical to the expression of increasingly elaborate ideas and to meeting the demands of academic tasks. Complex syntax development begins in the preschool years. It ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2014
Joining Clauses with Subordinate Conjunctions: One Type of Complex Syntax
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian K. Weiler
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • C. Melanie Schuele
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Financial Disclosure: Brian K. Weiler is a PhD student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. C. Melanie Schuele is the director of the Child and Language Literacy Lab and is an associate professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Our research in complex syntax has been supported by US Department of Education (H325D080075), NIDCD of the National Institute of Health (DC007329), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and the Schubert Center for Child Development at Case Western Reserve University. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Education, or our other funding sources.
    Financial Disclosure: Brian K. Weiler is a PhD student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. C. Melanie Schuele is the director of the Child and Language Literacy Lab and is an associate professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Our research in complex syntax has been supported by US Department of Education (H325D080075), NIDCD of the National Institute of Health (DC007329), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and the Schubert Center for Child Development at Case Western Reserve University. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Education, or our other funding sources.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Brian K. Weiler has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. C. Melanie Schuele has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Brian K. Weiler has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. C. Melanie Schuele has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2014
Joining Clauses with Subordinate Conjunctions: One Type of Complex Syntax
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, November 2014, Vol. 21, 182-191. doi:10.1044/lle21.4.182
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, November 2014, Vol. 21, 182-191. doi:10.1044/lle21.4.182

The purpose of this article is to enhance clinicians' knowledge and skills about one complex syntax type, subordinate conjunction clauses. Children's complex syntax skills are critical to the expression of increasingly elaborate ideas and to meeting the demands of academic tasks. Complex syntax development begins in the preschool years. It is essential for clinicians to support young children's complex syntax development. To this end, the present article offers a framework to support a clinician's consideration of the range of subordinate conjunction clauses that appear in the spoken language of young children.

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