Dyslexia: Why Is This Diagnosis so Challenging? Dyslexia, the most commonly identified learning disability, frequently goes unidentified in school age children, especially when children perform adequately on high stakes tests. The purpose of this paper is to aid speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in diagnosing children who have dyslexia. We address profiles of behavioral strengths and weaknesses that are ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2014
Dyslexia: Why Is This Diagnosis so Challenging?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda J. Lombardino
    Department of School Psychology, Special Education, and Early Childhood Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Laurie M. Gauger
    Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Financial Disclosure: Linda J. Lombardino is a Professor at the University of Florida. Laurie M. Gauger is a Clinical Speech-Language Pathologist at the University of Florida.
    Financial Disclosure: Linda J. Lombardino is a Professor at the University of Florida. Laurie M. Gauger is a Clinical Speech-Language Pathologist at the University of Florida.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Linda J. Lombardino has previously published in the subject area. Laurie M. Gauger has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Linda J. Lombardino has previously published in the subject area. Laurie M. Gauger has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2014
Dyslexia: Why Is This Diagnosis so Challenging?
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 98-113. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.98
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 98-113. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.98

Dyslexia, the most commonly identified learning disability, frequently goes unidentified in school age children, especially when children perform adequately on high stakes tests. The purpose of this paper is to aid speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in diagnosing children who have dyslexia. We address profiles of behavioral strengths and weaknesses that are characteristic of these children and we present sample evaluation profiles of a few children with dyslexia that we have tested over the past decade.

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