Coordinator's Column Welcome to the July issue of Perspectives in Language Learning and Education. In response to requests from SIG 1 affiliates, this issue is devoted to the topic of written language. The articles demonstrate the breadth and complexity of the written modality by exploring diagnosis and intervention issues. Moreover, this ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   July 01, 2014
Coordinator's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Reading & Writing Disorders / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   July 01, 2014
Coordinator's Column
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 87. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.87
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 87. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.87
Welcome to the July issue of Perspectives in Language Learning and Education. In response to requests from SIG 1 affiliates, this issue is devoted to the topic of written language. The articles demonstrate the breadth and complexity of the written modality by exploring diagnosis and intervention issues. Moreover, this issue offers something for practitioners who work with every age group. Preschool writing skills are described by Sonia Cabell, Cynthia Puranik, and Laura Tortorelli in an article that includes information about assessing early writing and providing intervention in therapy settings as well as early childhood classrooms.
Linda Lombardino and Laurie Gauger provide an opportunity to consider practical realities related to the diagnosis of dyslexia. Despite the prevalence of this diagnosis, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are often challenged by the educational and clinical factors that intersect with this population. The authors discuss behavioral strengths and weaknesses that are common in students who have dyslexia and describe clinical profiles to guide SLPs in thinking about the diagnostic characteristics of this common disability. For SLPs who serve children with handwriting challenges, Jane Andrews and Linda Lombardino briefly review the history of penmanship instruction in America and examine the potential benefits that cursive writing can provide for students who struggle with the basic mechanics of penmanship. They offer a systematic approach for addressing writing disabilities through instruction in cursive writing. SLPs who are seeking practical suggestions to augment their therapy toolkit will be interested in this article. Facilitating expository language skills is examined by Mark Hallenbeck who explains how SLPs can teach students a writing strategy that exploits higher level cognition to yield better written products. His work reminds us that we need to hold high written language expectations for the children we serve. Students with language learning disabilities can become accomplished writers and SLPs can help them learn to express their complex ideas in written form.
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