Strategies for Teaching Handwriting to Children with Writing Disabilities Handwriting abilities have been shown to play an important role in the academic performance of children, especially children who have disorders of written language. Dysgraphia is the most commonly identified neurodevelopmental grapho-motor disorder of handwriting and it often co-occurs with dyslexia. Even in an age where much print is accomplished ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2014
Strategies for Teaching Handwriting to Children with Writing Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jane E. Andrews
    President, Learnable Linguistics, Petoskey, Michigan
  • Linda J. Lombardino
    Department of School Psychology, Special Education, and Early Childhood Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Financial Disclosure: Jane E. Andrews is the President of Learning Learnable Linguistics. Linda J. Lombardino is a Professor at the University of Florida.
    Financial Disclosure: Jane E. Andrews is the President of Learning Learnable Linguistics. Linda J. Lombardino is a Professor at the University of Florida.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jane E. Andrews has previously published in the subject area. Linda J. Lombardino has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jane E. Andrews has previously published in the subject area. Linda J. Lombardino has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2014
Strategies for Teaching Handwriting to Children with Writing Disabilities
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 114-126. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.114
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2014, Vol. 21, 114-126. doi:10.1044/lle21.3.114

Handwriting abilities have been shown to play an important role in the academic performance of children, especially children who have disorders of written language. Dysgraphia is the most commonly identified neurodevelopmental grapho-motor disorder of handwriting and it often co-occurs with dyslexia. Even in an age where much print is accomplished by keyboarding, legible handwriting continues to be an indispensable skill for a range of academic, vocational, social, and professional activities. In keeping with research that supports the importance of cursive writing, this paper focuses on guidelines for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who evaluate, diagnose, and treat children with disorders of written language accompanied by marked deficits in handwriting.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.