A Clinical Model for Developing Executive Function Skills The purpose of this article is to describe a therapeutic program developed by our clinic that (a) considers the core features of executive control which must be understood in order to effectively implement an executive function treatment model, (b) how we included those features into a treatment program that successfully ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2014
A Clinical Model for Developing Executive Function Skills
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Ward
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Co-Director, Cognitive Connections, Concord, MA
  • Kristen Jacobsen
    Co-Director, Cognitive Connections, Concord, MA
  • Financial Disclosure: Sarah Ward is a speech-language pathologist, Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, LLP, and an Adjunct Instructor at MGH Institute of Health Professions. Kristen Jacobsen is a speech-language pathologist and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, LLP.
    Financial Disclosure: Sarah Ward is a speech-language pathologist, Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, LLP, and an Adjunct Instructor at MGH Institute of Health Professions. Kristen Jacobsen is a speech-language pathologist and Co-Director of Cognitive Connections, LLP.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sarah Ward has no nonfinancial interested related to the content of this article. Kristen Jacobsen has no nonfinancial interested related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sarah Ward has no nonfinancial interested related to the content of this article. Kristen Jacobsen has no nonfinancial interested related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2014
A Clinical Model for Developing Executive Function Skills
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2014, Vol. 21, 72-84. doi:10.1044/lle21.2.72
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2014, Vol. 21, 72-84. doi:10.1044/lle21.2.72

The purpose of this article is to describe a therapeutic program developed by our clinic that (a) considers the core features of executive control which must be understood in order to effectively implement an executive function treatment model, (b) how we included those features into a treatment program that successfully teaches students to develop independent executive function skills, and (c) demonstrates how the model has been applied across the developmental age span.

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