Language and Executive Functions: Self-Talk for Self-Regulation Self-talk, particularly privatized, inner speech is used as a tool to support self-regulation. Thus, adequate language is a necessary component for regulatory inner speech. However, behavioral control and planful deliberation is also dependent upon adequate executive function (EF) development. Increasing evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) display ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2014
Language and Executive Functions: Self-Talk for Self-Regulation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill K. Fahy
    Department of Communications Disorders and Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Financial Disclosure: Jill K. Fahy is an Associate Professor at Eastern Illinois University. She is also the co-author of The Source for Development of Executive Functions (Richard & Fahy, 2005), published by LinguiSystems, Inc., and receives royalty payments.
    Financial Disclosure: Jill K. Fahy is an Associate Professor at Eastern Illinois University. She is also the co-author of The Source for Development of Executive Functions (Richard & Fahy, 2005), published by LinguiSystems, Inc., and receives royalty payments.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jill K. Fahy has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jill K. Fahy has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2014
Language and Executive Functions: Self-Talk for Self-Regulation
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2014, Vol. 21, 61-71. doi:10.1044/lle21.2.61
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2014, Vol. 21, 61-71. doi:10.1044/lle21.2.61

Self-talk, particularly privatized, inner speech is used as a tool to support self-regulation. Thus, adequate language is a necessary component for regulatory inner speech. However, behavioral control and planful deliberation is also dependent upon adequate executive function (EF) development. Increasing evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) display deficits in more than just language, with differences in various cognitive processes, the use of language for inner speech, and self-regulating EF. Assessment and treatment by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) should account for these variables. In particular, Vygotskian application of hands-on problem solving tasks is suggested to support the intersection of language and EF for planful, self-regulated efforts in children with SLI.

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