Comic Strip Videos This article describes a pilot of an intervention strategy that combined established evidence from the field of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) with evidence from other fields along with clinician experience to provide a pivotal learning experience that addressed reading comprehension along with social communication skills. The intervention strategy coined “comic ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2014
Comic Strip Videos
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sylvia Diehl
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Financial Disclosure: Sylvia Diehl is an Instructor-Level I at the University of South Florida.
    Financial Disclosure: Sylvia Diehl is an Instructor-Level I at the University of South Florida.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sylvia Diehl has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sylvia Diehl has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2014
Comic Strip Videos
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2014, Vol. 21, 21-28. doi:10.1044/lle21.1.21
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2014, Vol. 21, 21-28. doi:10.1044/lle21.1.21

This article describes a pilot of an intervention strategy that combined established evidence from the field of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) with evidence from other fields along with clinician experience to provide a pivotal learning experience that addressed reading comprehension along with social communication skills. The intervention strategy coined “comic strip videos” used speech and thought bubbles in comic strip form followed by video supported self-management. The comic strip format was used much like a storyboard to show the overall outline of the story designed to help the students to focus on important information. The speech and thought bubbles were utilized to help the students gain character perspective and social information. Finally, a video of the students acting out the story was intended to support the development self-management of social communication skills. The intervention addressed a combination of literacy and social communication goals in a single process.

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