Guiding Parents From Diverse Cultural Backgrounds to Promote Language Skills in Preschoolers With Language Disorders: Two Challenges and Proposed Solutions for Them In providing culturally sensitive services for the families of young children with language disorders, the SLP is often confronted with a set of challenges. The first relates to avoiding making assumptions about the communication practices of any particular family, and is called the “avoid stereotyping” challenge. The solution offered is ... Article
Article  |   August 2013
Guiding Parents From Diverse Cultural Backgrounds to Promote Language Skills in Preschoolers With Language Disorders: Two Challenges and Proposed Solutions for Them
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne van Kleeck
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX
  • Disclosure: Anne van Kleeck has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Anne van Kleeck has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • © 2013 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   August 2013
Guiding Parents From Diverse Cultural Backgrounds to Promote Language Skills in Preschoolers With Language Disorders: Two Challenges and Proposed Solutions for Them
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, August 2013, Vol. 20, 78-85. doi:10.1044/lle20.3.78
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, August 2013, Vol. 20, 78-85. doi:10.1044/lle20.3.78

In providing culturally sensitive services for the families of young children with language disorders, the SLP is often confronted with a set of challenges. The first relates to avoiding making assumptions about the communication practices of any particular family, and is called the “avoid stereotyping” challenge. The solution offered is to repurpose the routines-based interview that is becoming more widely used in early intervention services (e.g., Bernheimer & Weisner, 2007; McWilliam, 2012; McWilliam, Casey, & Sims, 2009) in order to help the SLP determine (in a nonjudgmental fashion) the frequency and specific nature of interactions that occur in the home. When families do not display interaction patterns that evidence suggests foster language development and school success, how does the SLP both value the family's preferred practices and offer suggestions for interaction that may contradict them? The solution offered for this challenge, referred to as the “avoiding mixed messages” challenge, is to talk with parents about how such interactions will better prepare their child for the language demands of school. This is referred to as the “blaming the schools” solution.

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