A New Perspective on Developmental Language Problems: Perceptual Organization Deficits Children with a variety of language-related problems, including dyslexia, experience difficulty processing the acoustic speech signal, leading to proposals of diagnostic entities known as auditory processing deficits. Although descriptions of these deficits vary across accounts, most hinge on the idea that problems arise at the level of detecting and/or discriminating ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2012
A New Perspective on Developmental Language Problems: Perceptual Organization Deficits
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Nittrouer
    Department of Otolaryngology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • Disclosure: Susan Nittrouer has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Susan Nittrouer has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2012
A New Perspective on Developmental Language Problems: Perceptual Organization Deficits
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, August 2012, Vol. 19, 87-97. doi:10.1044/lle19.3.87
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, August 2012, Vol. 19, 87-97. doi:10.1044/lle19.3.87

Children with a variety of language-related problems, including dyslexia, experience difficulty processing the acoustic speech signal, leading to proposals of diagnostic entities known as auditory processing deficits. Although descriptions of these deficits vary across accounts, most hinge on the idea that problems arise at the level of detecting and/or discriminating sensory inputs. In this article, the author re-examines that idea and proposes that the difficulty more likely arises in how those sensations get organized into service for auditory comprehension of language.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant No. R01 DC00633 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the National Institutes of Health. The author thanks Amanda Caldwell, Joanna Lowenstein, and Rebecca McCauley for helpful suggestions on an earlier version.
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