Pragmatic Language in Autism and Fragile X Syndrome: Genetic and Clinical Applications Evidence suggests a strong genetic basis to autism. Our research program focuses on identifying genetically meaningful phenotypes in autism through family-genetic and cross-population methods, with a particular focus on language and social phenotypes that have been shown to aggregate in families of individuals with autism. In this article, we discuss ... Article
Article  |   March 2012
Pragmatic Language in Autism and Fragile X Syndrome: Genetic and Clinical Applications
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Molly Losh
    Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Gary E. Martin
    FPG Child Development Institute, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Jessica Klusek
    FPG Child Development Institute, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Abigail L. Hogan-Brown
    Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Autism Spectrum / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Articles
Article   |   March 2012
Pragmatic Language in Autism and Fragile X Syndrome: Genetic and Clinical Applications
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2012, Vol. 19, 48-55. doi:10.1044/lle19.2.48
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2012, Vol. 19, 48-55. doi:10.1044/lle19.2.48

Evidence suggests a strong genetic basis to autism. Our research program focuses on identifying genetically meaningful phenotypes in autism through family-genetic and cross-population methods, with a particular focus on language and social phenotypes that have been shown to aggregate in families of individuals with autism. In this article, we discuss recent findings from family study research implicating particular language and personality features as markers for genetic liability to autism and Fragile X syndrome and Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1)–related variation in relatives. We conclude with consideration of the clinical implications of such findings.

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