Behavior Problems and Social Functioning in Adolescents With Language Impairment Adolescents with language impairment (LI) often are underidentified and may be perceived as lazy or noncompliant, rather than as individuals with LI. In this article, the author discusses two possible reasons for this underdiagnosis of LI in adolescents. First, many adolescents with LI present with comorbid behavior problems, which may ... Article
Article  |   March 2013
Behavior Problems and Social Functioning in Adolescents With Language Impairment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney Karasinski
    Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI
  • Disclosure: Courtney Karasinski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Courtney Karasinski has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • © 2013 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 2013
Behavior Problems and Social Functioning in Adolescents With Language Impairment
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2013, Vol. 20, 36-43. doi:10.1044/lle20.2.36
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2013, Vol. 20, 36-43. doi:10.1044/lle20.2.36

Adolescents with language impairment (LI) often are underidentified and may be perceived as lazy or noncompliant, rather than as individuals with LI. In this article, the author discusses two possible reasons for this underdiagnosis of LI in adolescents. First, many adolescents with LI present with comorbid behavior problems, which may be the primary concern of parents and school officials. Second, some adolescents with LI perform within age expectations on basic linguistic skills, but difficulties are apparent in higher-level linguistic tasks, including oral and written narrative comprehension and production. Given that adolescents with LI may present with comorbid behavior and academic and social deficits, it is crucial that speech-language pathologists provide identification, direct intervention, consultation with teachers, and leadership in order to facilitate improvement in behavioral, academic, and social functioning. The article provides recommendations for and examples of interventions, which must be administered using contextually relevant activities, and also highlights the importance of collaboration with others in the adolescent’s social and academic settings.

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