Clinical Issues: Working With Families and Teams To Address the Needs of Children With Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are an integral part of any team addressing the needs of children with mental retardation and developmental disabilities (MR/DD) and their families. But they do not provide assessment and intervention services in isolation. The ASHA documents on MR/DD define several principles SLPs should use to guide their ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   October 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Working With Families and Teams To Address the Needs of Children With Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia A. Prelock
    Department of Communication Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
Article Information
Special Populations / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   October 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Working With Families and Teams To Address the Needs of Children With Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2006, Vol. 13, 7-11. doi:10.1044/lle13.3.7
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2006, Vol. 13, 7-11. doi:10.1044/lle13.3.7
Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are an integral part of any team addressing the needs of children with mental retardation and developmental disabilities (MR/DD) and their families. But they do not provide assessment and intervention services in isolation. The ASHA documents on MR/DD define several principles SLPs should use to guide their roles and responsibilities when working with persons with MR/DD (ASHA, 2005a). These principles are founded in the basic rights of this population and have important implications for teaming and collaboration with families and other professionals. In this article, the role of the family and the value of a collaborative process during assessment and program planning for children with MR/DD is considered. The following principle should serve as the general guide for SLPs working with families who have children with MR/DD

SLPs ensure that decisions about team members, service delivery models and settings, and how services are delivered are based on the individual needs and preferences of persons with MR/DD and their families. Families and persons with MR/DD are integral to the assessment process and are pivotal decision makers in determining specific goals and objectives and how clinical services should be provided. (ASHA, 2005a, p. 6)

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