Clinical Issues: A Speech-Language Approach to Beginning Reading In our history as a profession, it was only 30 years ago that the term “language” became part of our title (Butler, 1999), when we moved from being “speech teachers” to “speech-language pathologists.” The acknowledgment of the critical relationship between the spoken and written forms of language largely spurred that ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: A Speech-Language Approach to Beginning Reading
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Evelyn R. Klein
    Speech-Language-Hearing Science Program, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Adele Gerber
    Philadelphia, PA
  • Jenny Roberts
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: A Speech-Language Approach to Beginning Reading
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 25-29. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.25
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 25-29. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.25
In our history as a profession, it was only 30 years ago that the term “language” became part of our title (Butler, 1999), when we moved from being “speech teachers” to “speech-language pathologists.” The acknowledgment of the critical relationship between the spoken and written forms of language largely spurred that change. Knowledge of this relationship has increased steadily over the past few decades. As early as 15 years ago, the vast majority of respondents in one survey examining the attitudes and work requirements of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) felt that it was the job of the SLP to manage both oral language and reading problems in children with language impairments (Casby, 1988). Since that time, SLPs have become increasingly informed of the language-reading connection, and in 2001, ASHA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Reading and Written Language Disorders released a position paper guiding speech-language pathologists in this area (2001a). A detailed knowledge and skills document (ASHA, 2002) changes the SLP’s Scope of Practice (ASHA, 2001b) and mandatory coursework in both the spoken and written forms of language as of 2005 to ensure that SLPs will continue to be well-educated and prepared to work with individuals experiencing difficulty with the spoken and/or written forms of language.
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