Clinical Issues: Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology (Practice): What’s New? What’s new about evidence-based speech-language pathology? In 2001, “evidence-based practice” or EBP was a relatively unknown concept to most speech-language pathologists (SLPs), but most SLPs recognize its meaning today. The recognition of EBP has increased steadily from 2002 to the present as suggested by the numbers of ASHA Convention presentations ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology (Practice): What’s New?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Timothy Meline
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology (Practice): What’s New?
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 2-4. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.2
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 2-4. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.2
What’s new about evidence-based speech-language pathology? In 2001, “evidence-based practice” or EBP was a relatively unknown concept to most speech-language pathologists (SLPs), but most SLPs recognize its meaning today. The recognition of EBP has increased steadily from 2002 to the present as suggested by the numbers of ASHA Convention presentations on the topic. A search of ASHA Convention abstracts (keywords “EBP” and “evidence-based practice”) identified 3 presentations in 2002, 9 presentations in 2003, 10 presentations in 2004, and many more in 2005 (ASHA’s 2005 Convention theme was Using Evidence to Support Clinical Practice).
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) emerged in the 1990s largely as a consequence of the exponential growth of the Internet. The phenomenon of networking (connecting computers around the globe) gave rise to the Information Age. At no previous time in history, except for Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press circa 1450, has access to information taken such a dramatic leap. The Internet allows vast amounts of information to be accessed and updated with relative ease. EBM emerged anew in the 1990s, but its philosophical origins date back to nineteenth-century Europe (Reilly, Douglas, & Oates, 2004). Thus, evidence-based practice is not a new idea. Indeed, SLPs have traditionally embraced “best evidence” for their practices. The difference between traditional and evidence-based practice is that EBP formalizes the traditional process and filters the literature to insure that the evidence is strong evidence. Physicians and nurses accepted EBP in the 1990s, and other health-related professions adopted EBP as the preferred practice model in ensuing years (ASHA, 2005).
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