Clinical Issues: Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Language Intervention With Primary Grade Children Parents of children with disabilities sometimes request specific kinds of services that they have learned about from news stories, the internet, or friends. These sources of information can alert parents and clinicians to beneficial treatments. On the other hand, mass media outlets and word of mouth can also spread biased ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Language Intervention With Primary Grade Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Austin
  • Sandra P. Laing
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2006
Clinical Issues: Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Language Intervention With Primary Grade Children
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 10-16. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.10
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2006, Vol. 13, 10-16. doi:10.1044/lle13.1.10
Parents of children with disabilities sometimes request specific kinds of services that they have learned about from news stories, the internet, or friends. These sources of information can alert parents and clinicians to beneficial treatments. On the other hand, mass media outlets and word of mouth can also spread biased and unreliable information. To avoid such a problem, clinicians need to employ a decision-making process that enables them to select the best assessment and intervention procedures for a particular situation.
Laing and Gillam (in press) suggested that clinicians adapt Porzsolt et al’s (2003)  Evidence Based Practice (EBP) decision-making process (see Table 1) for intervention decisions about children with language impairments or language-based learning disabilities. This seven-step process helps clinicians systematically integrate research evidence with their clinical knowledge, their personal experience, parent/client preferences, and school district policies. In this article, we apply this decisionmaking process to the situation in which parents have asked a school district to provide Fast ForWord-Language for their primary grade child with language and reading problems.
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