Clinical Issues: Determining Directions for Speech-Language Intervention in Native Communities Leaders in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education have called for re-examination of the intervention approaches used to serve AI/AN students with disabilities, as part of the broader educational reform movement (Research Agenda Working Group, Strang, & von Glatz, 2001). Moreover, a recent Presidential Executive Order (2004) recognized the need to ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   July 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Determining Directions for Speech-Language Intervention in Native Communities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ella Inglebret
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
  • Joanne Harrison
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the following tribal members who reviewed this manuscript: Julian Argel (Tsimpshian-Haida), Barbara Aston (Wyandotte), and Ron Pond (Umatilla).
    The authors gratefully acknowledge the following tribal members who reviewed this manuscript: Julian Argel (Tsimpshian-Haida), Barbara Aston (Wyandotte), and Ron Pond (Umatilla).×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   July 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Determining Directions for Speech-Language Intervention in Native Communities
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2005, Vol. 12, 6-9. doi:10.1044/lle12.2.6
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2005, Vol. 12, 6-9. doi:10.1044/lle12.2.6
Leaders in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education have called for re-examination of the intervention approaches used to serve AI/AN students with disabilities, as part of the broader educational reform movement (Research Agenda Working Group, Strang, & von Glatz, 2001). Moreover, a recent Presidential Executive Order (2004) recognized the need to implement the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 “in a manner that is consistent with tribal traditions, languages, and cultures” (p. 1). Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), as members of educational teams, are faced with the challenge of responding effectively to the cultural and linguistic variations that are interwoven with service delivery in specific communities. The purpose of this article is to identify some factors for SLPs to consider when developing and implementing intervention in Native communities.
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