Clinical Issues: Language Intervention From A Bilingual Mindset With numbers of children from diverse linguistic backgrounds increasing, most speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can expect to encounter such children on their caseloads. Depending on clinicians’ own backgrounds and previous experience, many do not feel adequately prepared for the challenge of working with linguistically diverse learners. Probably the most commonly asked ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   July 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Language Intervention From A Bilingual Mindset
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elin Thordardottir
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill UniversityMontreal, Quebec, Canada
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   July 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Language Intervention From A Bilingual Mindset
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2005, Vol. 12, 17-22. doi:10.1044/lle12.2.17
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2005, Vol. 12, 17-22. doi:10.1044/lle12.2.17
With numbers of children from diverse linguistic backgrounds increasing, most speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can expect to encounter such children on their caseloads. Depending on clinicians’ own backgrounds and previous experience, many do not feel adequately prepared for the challenge of working with linguistically diverse learners. Probably the most commonly asked questions regarding clinical intervention with these children concern the language or languages to be used. In which language should intervention be conducted? Should it target one language or both? Is it necessary that clinicians working with these children be bilingual or can monolingual clinicians be effective in serving these children? What are the special needs of a bilingual child and how should intervention strategies be modified in order to meet them? In spite of considerable research showing that bilingualism does not cause or increase the severity of language impairments, parents and clinicians continue to ask whether it might be advisable for children with language impairment to avoid bilingualism.
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