Incorporating Counseling Into Our Intervention With Students With Language-Learning Impairments: The Road Less Traveled? Students with language-learning impairments, especially those in the later elementary, middle school, high school, and even college, levels are beginning to receive more attention in the literature (see the recent Clinical Forum in the July 1999 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in the Schools). While more information ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1999
Incorporating Counseling Into Our Intervention With Students With Language-Learning Impairments: The Road Less Traveled?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenn Apel
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1999
Incorporating Counseling Into Our Intervention With Students With Language-Learning Impairments: The Road Less Traveled?
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1999, Vol. 6, 4-7. doi:10.1044/lle6.3.4
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1999, Vol. 6, 4-7. doi:10.1044/lle6.3.4
Students with language-learning impairments, especially those in the later elementary, middle school, high school, and even college, levels are beginning to receive more attention in the literature (see the recent Clinical Forum in the July 1999 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in the Schools). While more information is being presented on how to facilitate these students’ language and literacy skills, much less is being discussed about the emotional side of their impairments. Specifically, these students tend to have poor selfesteem and low self-concepts of their ability to learn to read and write. Fifteen years ago, Stanovich (1986)  discussed the “Matthew Effect,” which states that while students with typical literacy skills continue to improve their literacy skills, students with poor literacy skills tend to fall further behind their peers. Accompanying this negative spiraling effect is a decrease in self-concept and worth (e.g., Meltzer, Roditi, Houser, & Perlman, 1998). In fact, some authors (McBride & Siegel, 1997) have suggested that students with language-learning impairments may be more prone to suicide than students with typical language skills.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.