Clinical Issues: Positive Behavior Support Children with behavioral challenges are at great risk for lives that are characterized by social isolation and segregated placements. These behaviors are often obstacles in the child’s ability to learn optimally in educational and therapeutic settings as well as in the child’s ability to interact with peers and adults. Several ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Positive Behavior Support
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  • Pamelazita BuschbacherGuest Editor
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Development / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Positive Behavior Support
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2005, Vol. 12, 1-2. doi:10.1044/lle12.1.1-a
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2005, Vol. 12, 1-2. doi:10.1044/lle12.1.1-a
Children with behavioral challenges are at great risk for lives that are characterized by social isolation and segregated placements. These behaviors are often obstacles in the child’s ability to learn optimally in educational and therapeutic settings as well as in the child’s ability to interact with peers and adults.
Several studies have consistently suggested the co-occurrence of challenging behavior and communication (i.e., articulation, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, written language, etc.) delays/disabilities in children. Estimates of this co-occurrence range from 62–95% (Gallagher, 1999)
Recent amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA, 1997) have mandated that a process of functional assessment and positive behavior support be provided for students who demonstrate challenging behavior. Positive Behavior Support (PBS) is a holistic approach for understanding and changing a child’s behavior that is based on humanistic values and research. It can be used to address problem behavior that may range from withdrawal, repetitive behaviors, aggression, tantrums, and self-injury. At its core is the assumption that all behaviors serve a communicative function and that, although the challenging behavior exhibited by these children may be stigmatizing, intrusive to optimal educational/therapeutic goal attainment, and often dangerous, they are best conceptualized as communicative attempts with those in their environment. Additionally, the support plan that results from a functional assessment and the development of hypotheses about the behavior include prevention strategies, generally communicative in nature, and the teaching of communicative replacement skills for the challenging behavior.
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