Clinical Issues: Summary of Student Research Grant: Learning of Non-targeted Concepts of Print In recent years, the field of communication sciences and disorders has given great attention to the role of speech-language pathologists in facilitating the development of early literacy skills in children with speech and language disorders. The impetus for speech-language pathologists to engage in practices to promote later academic success is ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Summary of Student Research Grant: Learning of Non-targeted Concepts of Print
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherri Lovelace
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Sharon R. Stewart
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Kentucky, Lexington
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2005
Clinical Issues: Summary of Student Research Grant: Learning of Non-targeted Concepts of Print
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2005, Vol. 12, 16-18. doi:10.1044/lle12.1.16
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2005, Vol. 12, 16-18. doi:10.1044/lle12.1.16
In recent years, the field of communication sciences and disorders has given great attention to the role of speech-language pathologists in facilitating the development of early literacy skills in children with speech and language disorders. The impetus for speech-language pathologists to engage in practices to promote later academic success is the result of investigations demonstrating that young children’s language abilities contribute to later literacy achievement (Catts, Fey, & Proctor-Williams, 2000; Johnson et al., 1999). Because speech-language pathologists are often the primary interventionists for young children prior to formal education, it is essential that early support be provided to prevent, identify, and remediate early literacy difficulties. Therefore, it is imperative that speech-language pathologists implement intervention strategies that target processes crucial to both oral and written language development. The purpose of this study was to assess the acquisition of concepts of print presented as non-targeted information within the context of joint/shared book reading during language intervention sessions.
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