Clinical Issues: Disability, Loss, and Grieving: Implications and Suggestions for Speech and Language Professionals Few situations require greater understanding and skill in counseling techniques than serving clients and families who are grieving. Understanding the processes of loss, grieving, transformation, and growth are central to the work of all those involved in any part of the rehabilitation plan of services for individuals with disabilities. Without ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Disability, Loss, and Grieving: Implications and Suggestions for Speech and Language Professionals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah Gough
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Disability, Loss, and Grieving: Implications and Suggestions for Speech and Language Professionals
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2004, Vol. 11, 18-25. doi:10.1044/lle11.1.18
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2004, Vol. 11, 18-25. doi:10.1044/lle11.1.18
Few situations require greater understanding and skill in counseling techniques than serving clients and families who are grieving. Understanding the processes of loss, grieving, transformation, and growth are central to the work of all those involved in any part of the rehabilitation plan of services for individuals with disabilities. Without this understanding and appreciation for the client’s internal struggle, the “investment” in the therapy plan can be compromised and clinicians can experience feelings of inadequacy and frustration.
The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the very natural, normal, necessary process all humans experience in light of significant, life changing loss. In understanding how people are changed, how their identities are widened and deepened by their struggle with loss, clinicians can become more comfortable in the presence of their clients’ discomfort and can provide the type of support that will hasten the process of healing and rehabilitation.
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