Clinical Issues: Using Self-Anchored Rating Scales in Family-Centered Treatment There are many ways to intervene with children with speech and language disorders. Research consistently demonstrates that involving families results in better outcomes (Affleck, McGrade, McQueeney, & Allen, 1982; Casto & Mastopieri, 1986; Dunst, Trivette, & Cross, 1986; Guralnick, 1989). The question arises as to specific strategies clinicians can use ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   March 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Using Self-Anchored Rating Scales in Family-Centered Treatment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori J. Nelson
    Department of Speech Pathology, Sherman Healthcare Systems, Elgin, IL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   March 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Using Self-Anchored Rating Scales in Family-Centered Treatment
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2004, Vol. 11, 14-17. doi:10.1044/lle11.1.14
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2004, Vol. 11, 14-17. doi:10.1044/lle11.1.14
There are many ways to intervene with children with speech and language disorders. Research consistently demonstrates that involving families results in better outcomes (Affleck, McGrade, McQueeney, & Allen, 1982; Casto & Mastopieri, 1986; Dunst, Trivette, & Cross, 1986; Guralnick, 1989). The question arises as to specific strategies clinicians can use to enhance their involvement with families during treatment. One possible strategy, and the focus of this article, is the use of Self Anchored Rating Scales (SARS). Unlike scales that are based on normative standards, SARS are designed to facilitate treatment. When used in working with families, the family’s own language, meanings, and experiences are used to create individualized scales. These scales are used to gain insight into the family’s perception, to motivate and encourage clients, to discover exceptions to problems, to recognize progress, and to develop goals that are important to the family (Berg & DeShazer, 1993; Cade & O’Hanlon, 1993; Franklin, Corcoran, Nowicki, & Streeter, 1997; Selekman, 1997).
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