Clinical Issues: Observations of Chat Room Conversations on the Internet: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists Speech-language pathologists, as experts in communication disorders, tend to think of conversations as interactions that include both verbal and nonverbal information. We also assume that information in typical conversations is conveyed in a truthful, sincere, relevant and accurate manner (Grice, 1975). The computer technology explosion over the last 25 years ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   July 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Observations of Chat Room Conversations on the Internet: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dixie Sanger
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Barbara Moore-Brown
    Special and Alternative Education, El Rancho Unified School District, Pico Rivera, CA
  • Heidi Perry
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Mitzi Ritzman
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Normal Language Processing / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   July 01, 2004
Clinical Issues: Observations of Chat Room Conversations on the Internet: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2004, Vol. 11, 26-30. doi:10.1044/lle11.2.26
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2004, Vol. 11, 26-30. doi:10.1044/lle11.2.26
Speech-language pathologists, as experts in communication disorders, tend to think of conversations as interactions that include both verbal and nonverbal information. We also assume that information in typical conversations is conveyed in a truthful, sincere, relevant and accurate manner (Grice, 1975). The computer technology explosion over the last 25 years has provided yet another way that conversational interactions can occur. With a click of a button, individuals are able to share conversations on the Internet in “chat rooms/’ These settings provide groups of individuals opportunities to interact in “real time” discussions with each other on their computers. Interactions may be chaotic and include multiple conversations occurring simultaneously or in rapid succession (DiMarco & DiMarco, 2002). Access to New Literacies includes various genres such as text messaging, e-mail, chat rooms, and other related communications media. These communication modes are very much a part of adolescents’ academic and social lives (Gee, 2000; Moje, Young, Redence, & Moore, 2000; Moore-Brown & Montgomery, 2001). Access to these conversations does not include face-to-face interactions, essentially leaving them void of verbal and nonverbal cues. Though many chat rooms allow individuals to communicate about a variety of important topics and are educational as well as fun, chat rooms also present a real and present danger for female youth.
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