Clinical Issues: Asperger Syndrome: The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools As Klin (2003)  and Tsatsani (2003)  have described, Asperger syndrome (AS) is a condition on the autistic spectrum in which individuals show cognitive skills within the normal range, age-appropriate semantic and syntactic skills, with severely impaired pragmatic and social communication abilities, often including obsessive interests in restricted conversational topics. This ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   October 01, 2003
Clinical Issues: Asperger Syndrome: The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhea Paul
    Communication Disorders Department, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven CT
    Yale Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven CT
  • Dean Sutherland
    Department of Speech Therapy, Canterbury UniversityChristchurch, New Zealand
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   October 01, 2003
Clinical Issues: Asperger Syndrome: The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2003, Vol. 10, 9-15. doi:10.1044/lle10.3.9
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2003, Vol. 10, 9-15. doi:10.1044/lle10.3.9
As Klin (2003)  and Tsatsani (2003)  have described, Asperger syndrome (AS) is a condition on the autistic spectrum in which individuals show cognitive skills within the normal range, age-appropriate semantic and syntactic skills, with severely impaired pragmatic and social communication abilities, often including obsessive interests in restricted conversational topics. This combination of normal or above average intelligence and the range of impairments seen in people with AS, creates a host of life-long social integration problems (Attwood, 1998). Young people with AS are often treated as social outcasts and subjected to a range of negative behaviors such as teasing and bullying (Frith, 1991). Speech-language pathologists working in schools can contribute to the well-being of students with AS by becoming knowledgeable about this condition and developing effective assessment and intervention strategies.
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