Evidence-Based Practice Tutorial #5: Confidence Interval Although the communication sciences and disorders literature frequently references confidence intervals (CIs) in the context of testing, CIs are not frequently addressed in our intervention literature. Recall that CI signifies the certainty that a value represents the true value. Thus, the typical CI of 95% reflects a range of values ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   July 01, 2003
Evidence-Based Practice Tutorial #5: Confidence Interval
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia Hargrove
    Department of Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services, Minnesota State University, Mankato MN
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Evidence-Based Practice Tutorial
Tutorial   |   July 01, 2003
Evidence-Based Practice Tutorial #5: Confidence Interval
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2003, Vol. 10, 33. doi:10.1044/lle10.2.33
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2003, Vol. 10, 33. doi:10.1044/lle10.2.33
Although the communication sciences and disorders literature frequently references confidence intervals (CIs) in the context of testing, CIs are not frequently addressed in our intervention literature. Recall that CI signifies the certainty that a value represents the true value. Thus, the typical CI of 95% reflects a range of values within which the true value lies in 95 out of 100 cases.
CIs have potential for use in evidence-based practice (EBP) treatment when estimating the strength of the difference between a treatment and a control group or between two treatment groups. The upper and lower boundaries of the CI are called confidence limits, and they can be used to determine important insights such as the adequacy of the number of subjects in the study, if a study in which the experimental treatment has been judged to be superior to the control treatment (positive study) needs to be viewed cautiously, and if a study in which the experimental treatment has NOT been judged to be superior to the control treatment (negative study) has any potential clinical utility.
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