Best Practices for Students with Autism As the incidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) continues to rise, there is a greater need for all educational staff to have knowledge of autism. The speech-language pathologists at Niles Township District for Special Education (NTDSE) have extensive experience working with people with autism. Based on research and our experience, ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2003
Best Practices for Students with Autism
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah Bray
    Niles Township District for Special Education, Morton Grove, IL
  • Christine Brennan
    Niles Township District for Special Education, Morton Grove, IL
  • Heidi Rabe
    Niles Township District for Special Education, Morton Grove, IL
  • Alison Schwarz
    Niles Township District for Special Education, Morton Grove, IL
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2003
Best Practices for Students with Autism
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2003, Vol. 10, 21-24. doi:10.1044/lle10.2.21
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2003, Vol. 10, 21-24. doi:10.1044/lle10.2.21
As the incidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) continues to rise, there is a greater need for all educational staff to have knowledge of autism. The speech-language pathologists at Niles Township District for Special Education (NTDSE) have extensive experience working with people with autism. Based on research and our experience, we have developed a model of best practices when working with students with ASD.
NTDSE is a special education cooperative with 10 member districts in four northern suburbs of Chicago. It provides a continuum of special education services to students from birth to 21 years. Currently, 61 students within these districts have an educational diagnosis of ASD and 17 attend the Julia Molloy Education Center. While these 17 students’ needs cannot be met in a regular education school, they have opportunities to work on social skills with peers in a regular education setting. The remaining 44 students are educated in less restrictive environments as appropriate to meet their needs.
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