Helping Families Gain Acceptance of AAC Strategies Clinicians working with children who have little or no functional speech, due to either developmental or acquired conditions, are universally concerned about helping those children communicate effectively. An increasing number of professionals are using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) approaches with these children. While there is a growing knowledge ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2001
Helping Families Gain Acceptance of AAC Strategies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carole Zangari
    Tyler Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2001
Helping Families Gain Acceptance of AAC Strategies
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 14-17. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.14
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 14-17. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.14
Clinicians working with children who have little or no functional speech, due to either developmental or acquired conditions, are universally concerned about helping those children communicate effectively. An increasing number of professionals are using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) approaches with these children. While there is a growing knowledge base and empirical literature on the use of AAC strategies with children, many clinicians report being uncomfortable when counseling parents who are first considering AAC options.
All parents want their children to be able to speak clearly and effectively. Experienced clinicians generally have a good idea of which children will attain those skills relatively quickly and are comfortable counseling parents through the intervention process. Likewise, seasoned clinicians are usually able to identify those children who, due to severe motor or cognitive impairments, may never achieve that goal. Again, they are able to effectively counsel parents and assist them in dealing with the long and complex process of providing lifelong communication supports. Between those two ends of the continuum, however, are thousands of children for whom the ultimate communication outcome is less clear. Though these are children who will benefit from AAC strategies, clinicians lack the prognostic tools to be able to determine which children will need AAC supports as a stepping stone to becoming oral communicators, and which children will require AAC for a longer period of time. Without a firm grasp on how these children will fare, it is understandable that clinicians are less comfortable counseling parents.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.