Vocabulary Intervention to Improve Reading Comprehension for Students With Learning Disabilities Ryan is a middle school student with language learning disabilities (LLD) who has major problems in reading. His word recognition abilities are below grade level, but more debilitating are his reading comprehension difficulties, stemming in part from his serious vocabulary deficit. Even when he can decipher a word, he ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Vocabulary Intervention to Improve Reading Comprehension for Students With Learning Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara J. Ehren
    University of Kansas-Center for Research on Learning, Lawrence, KS
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Vocabulary Intervention to Improve Reading Comprehension for Students With Learning Disabilities
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2002, Vol. 9, 12-18. doi:10.1044/lle9.3.12
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2002, Vol. 9, 12-18. doi:10.1044/lle9.3.12
Ryan is a middle school student with language learning disabilities (LLD) who has major problems in reading. His word recognition abilities are below grade level, but more debilitating are his reading comprehension difficulties, stemming in part from his serious vocabulary deficit. Even when he can decipher a word, he often does not know its meaning. Occasionally, he can figure out word meaning using the context of the passage, but there are so many words he doesn’t know that reading comprehension is seriously impaired.
Like many other struggling readers, Ryan’s problem with vocabulary has increased as he has gotten older. His limited vocabulary has contributed to a lack of background information necessary for reading comprehension and, therefore, to his reading comprehension problems. Even as a preschool youngster, he did not know many of the words that his peers knew, and he never learned new words fast enough to bridge the gap. As a high school student, he will face severe challenges in completing diploma requirements, because his widening vocabulary gap will make constructing meaning from textbooks a frustrating, if not impossible, task.
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