Evidence-Based Practice: Applications to Speech-Language Pathology What is evidence-based practice (EBP)? Sackett, Straus, Richardson, Rosenberg, and Haynes (2000)  recently defined it as “the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values” (p. 1). From this perspective EBP reflects the following core assumptions (Sackett, Rosenberg, Gray, Haynes & Richardson, 1996): To ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2002
Evidence-Based Practice: Applications to Speech-Language Pathology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanya M. Gallagher
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   May 01, 2002
Evidence-Based Practice: Applications to Speech-Language Pathology
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 2002, Vol. 9, 2-5. doi:10.1044/lle9.1.2
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 2002, Vol. 9, 2-5. doi:10.1044/lle9.1.2
What is evidence-based practice (EBP)? Sackett, Straus, Richardson, Rosenberg, and Haynes (2000)  recently defined it as “the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values” (p. 1). From this perspective EBP reflects the following core assumptions (Sackett, Rosenberg, Gray, Haynes & Richardson, 1996):
To some extent, then, EBP is not new. Speech-language pathologists have always been taught that they should make an ongoing commitment to read the latest research information and to translate it into clinical practice. EBP, which began in medicine in the late 1980s and gained widespread influence throughout the 1990s in medicine and other health care professions,has focused attention on what is needed in order to do what health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists, have historically been encouraged to do. EBP focused attention on what was meant by the vaguely defined phrase, “translate research into practice.” This literature highlighted the types of skills that are needed to do that, the concrete steps that must be followed to do that, and the kinds of research information that must be available in order to do that. In other words, EBP focused attention on what was needed in order to “translate research into practice,” which was more often the means to do EBP, rather than the desire or commitment to do it. That was importantly new. It highlighted critical gaps in the literature and underscored the need for change.
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