Pennsylvania’s Solution to Funding School-Based Assistive Technology The history of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) dates back to World War II. However, much of the history was not well documented, nor were the results formally kept for future repetition of research. Even though AAC work by F. Hall Roe (as cited in Blackstone, 1986) on the ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2001
Pennsylvania’s Solution to Funding School-Based Assistive Technology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lee M. Evans
    AAC/Assistive Technology, Luzerne Intermediate Unit, Kingston, PA
    Marywood University, Scranton, PA
    Adjunct Faculty
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2001
Pennsylvania’s Solution to Funding School-Based Assistive Technology
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 26-27. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.26
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 26-27. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.26
The history of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) dates back to World War II. However, much of the history was not well documented, nor were the results formally kept for future repetition of research. Even though AAC work by F. Hall Roe (as cited in Blackstone, 1986) on the development of language boards was one of the first systematic documentations noted, modern day research and practice did not emerge until the early 1980s. This sudden emergence of this little used and informal method of communication treatment was due to the advent of the miniaturization of microcomputer technology and the development of much improved speech synthesis (Evans, 1989). Prior AAC work was kept to the application of manual language boards, signs, and gestural systems for a variety of non-vocal disabilities (Creedon, 1973; Larson, 1971; Sheaffer, 1980).
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