Augmented Language Intervention Project: From School-Aged Youth to Toddlers For more than a decade, we have focused our research on the development and implementation of an augmented language intervention, the System for Augmenting Language (SAL), for school-aged youth with moderate or severe mental retardation and severe communication disorders who previously had little or no success learning to communicate ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2001
Augmented Language Intervention Project: From School-Aged Youth to Toddlers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa Cheslock
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Mary Ann Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Lauren B. Adamson
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2001
Augmented Language Intervention Project: From School-Aged Youth to Toddlers
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 18-20. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.18
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, June 2001, Vol. 8, 18-20. doi:10.1044/lle8.1.18
For more than a decade, we have focused our research on the development and implementation of an augmented language intervention, the System for Augmenting Language (SAL), for school-aged youth with moderate or severe mental retardation and severe communication disorders who previously had little or no success learning to communicate symbolically. The SAL is comprised of five components that work in concert:
The SAL was implemented originally over a 2-year period with 13 school-aged male children and youth with severe cognitive and communicative disabilities. Our research aims were to determine if these school-aged children and youth could be taught to communicate using a naturalistic teaching approach coupled with a speech-output communication device; to examine if the initial instructional environment would make a difference in their learning; and to assess what language and communication gains, if any, they would make over the period. Outcomes from the study included the development of successful and effective communication use with adults and peers (e.g., Romski, Sevcik, Robinson, & Bakeman, 1994; Romski, Sevcik, & Wilkinson, 1994) as well as the mastery of symbol vocabulary in comprehension and production (Adamson, Romski, Deffebach, & Sevcik, 1992; Romski & Sevcik, 1996; Sevcik, Romski, Watkins, & Deffebach, 1995) and the emergence of symbol combinations (Wilkinson, Romski, & Sevcik, 1994).
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