From the Editor This issue of the newsletter is the result of collaboration between ASHA Division 1, Language Learning and Education and Division 14, Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations. Affiliates from each division have contributed articles that focus on issues pertaining to cultural and linguistic diversity in ... Editorial
Editorial  |   December 01, 2000
From the Editor
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   December 01, 2000
From the Editor
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, December 2000, Vol. 7, 1-2. doi:10.1044/lle7.3.1
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, December 2000, Vol. 7, 1-2. doi:10.1044/lle7.3.1
This issue of the newsletter is the result of collaboration between ASHA Division 1, Language Learning and Education and Division 14, Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations. Affiliates from each division have contributed articles that focus on issues pertaining to cultural and linguistic diversity in child language learning and education. The increase in the number of children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds who receive speech and language services emphasizes the need for additional information on the considerations to be made to ensure effective service delivery for these children.
Some of the authors for this issue of the newsletter discuss the language assessment process for children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Hwa-Froelich, Westby, and Schommer-Aikins identify problems associated with the use of available traditional language assessments to identify children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds who have language impairments. Because the tests too frequently result in the over- or under-identification of children from such backgrounds as having language impairments, there is a need to develop approaches to assessing a child’s “language learnability,” which refers to how quickly and easily a child can learn language. Hwa-Froelich, Westby, & Schommer-Aikins describe the two approaches that have been most often used to assess language learnability—fast mapping and dynamic assessment—and the application of such approaches to language assessment with culturally and linguistically diverse children. The authors then discuss factors that must be considered in developing measures of language learnability, such as the nature of the assessment tasks and the selection of language stimuli.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.