Photography as a Diagnostic Metaphor: A Case for Making Strategic Use of Standardized Testing The practice of cognitive referencing, in which discrepancies between IQ and achievement test scores must be demonstrated in order to determine disability, and/or gain access to services, has come under much debate. While some believe there are important reasons for seeking evidence of a discrepancy between IQ-based ability and ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2000
Photography as a Diagnostic Metaphor: A Case for Making Strategic Use of Standardized Testing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daelene King
    The Learning & Language Clinic, Seattle, WA.
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2000
Photography as a Diagnostic Metaphor: A Case for Making Strategic Use of Standardized Testing
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2000, Vol. 7, 30-33. doi:10.1044/lle7.1.30
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2000, Vol. 7, 30-33. doi:10.1044/lle7.1.30
The practice of cognitive referencing, in which discrepancies between IQ and achievement test scores must be demonstrated in order to determine disability, and/or gain access to services, has come under much debate. While some believe there are important reasons for seeking evidence of a discrepancy between IQ-based ability and achievement in identifying students who are learning disabled (Brody & Mills, 1997; Wadsworth, Olson, Pennington, & DeFries, 2000), this practice has been increasingly criticized (Friel-Patti, 1999; Kavale & Forness, 1995; Leonard, 1991; Lyon, 1989; Stanovich, 1999). Others have gone so far as to propose that discrepancy-based notions of disability be abandoned altogether, arguing that this “pseudoscientific” method “overidentifies individuals with high IQs and under-identifies individuals with low IQs.” (Stanovich, 1999, p. 355). Friel-Patti states we must question why this common clinical practice survives in the absence of support in the literature. Meanwhile, as experts continue to debate the issue, for many of us in clinical practice, the fact remains that legal guidelines and school administration policies often dictate that we must use discrepancy criterion to establish eligibility (Casby, 1992).
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