From the Associate Editor This issue of the Division 1 News-letter focuses on the controversy surrounding the use of cognitive referencing (CR) as eligibility criteria for children and youth in need of speech-language services in the schools. A well-respected group of researchers, policy makers, and clinicians were invited to share their understanding of, ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2000
From the Associate Editor
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2000
From the Associate Editor
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2000, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/lle7.1.3-a
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2000, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/lle7.1.3-a
This issue of the Division 1 News-letter focuses on the controversy surrounding the use of cognitive referencing (CR) as eligibility criteria for children and youth in need of speech-language services in the schools. A well-respected group of researchers, policy makers, and clinicians were invited to share their understanding of, perspective on, and experience with the use of CR. Barbara Ehren offers an insightful perspective of the pragmatist’s lens to explain the views of the various players involved in eligibility criteria decision-making. Barriers affecting change and proactive approaches for facilitating change also are presented. Nickola Wolf Nelson presents compelling empirically based evidence for the limitations posed when CR/discrepancy models are used for determining eligibility criteria for speech-language pathology services. Kathleen Whitmire highlights pertinent information from a number of ASHA resources that document concerns regarding the use of CR/discrepancy models when deciding which children and youths qualify for speech-language intervention. Mary Blatchley-Hibbard summarizes the language demands for each subtest of the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd Edition (WISC-III), which is the most frequently used IQ test for school-age children. She also offers a number of practical suggestions so that speech-language pathologists and psychologists can begin collegial discussions and work more collaboratively when determining a child’s communication strengths and needs. Carolyn Isakson presents questions that are asked and factors that are considered when guidelines for eligibility decisions were developed for the state of Connecticut. These guidelines are consistent with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and suggestions for implementation of the guidelines also are discussed. Kathleen Herrin presents the impact of federal, state, and local regulations on one rural school district in New Hampshire. Daelene King ends the discussion with a case study that illustrates the ways that the speech-language pathologist can use scores from standardized language tests to assure that a child qualifies for speech-language services. Paula and I hope that you find this issue of the newsletter filled with valuable and practical information.
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