The Path to Proficient Word Recognition The following article is adapted from chapter 2, pages 31–40, of Language and Reading Disabilities, copyright 1999 by Allyn & Baker and is printed with the permission of the publisher. A course in language development is required by ASHA to meet the academic requirements for certification. There is little ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
The Path to Proficient Word Recognition
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
The Path to Proficient Word Recognition
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 4-7. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.4
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 4-7. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.4
The following article is adapted from chapter 2, pages 31–40, of Language and Reading Disabilities, copyright 1999 by Allyn & Baker and is printed with the permission of the publisher.
A course in language development is required by ASHA to meet the academic requirements for certification. There is little doubt that information about the processes and course of normal language development provides a crucial foundation for understanding, assessing, and treating children with language disorders. In recent years, many speech-language pathologists have begun to broaden their perspective of language to include literacy. ASHA publications and conferences are now filled with information about children with language learning problems, such as reading, writing, and spelling. There is also a wealth of information available in books, articles, and the Internet. The content of this issue of the Division 1 Newsletter is a case in point. Many programs in communication disorders now offer courses in this area as well. As far as I know, however, no program offers a separate course in reading development. Perhaps there is not enough content to justify an entire course, but if we are to serve children with reading problems, it is imperative to have a good grasp of the processes and knowledge involved in learning to read and write. In our first book on reading disabilities published 10 years ago, Hugh Catts and I did not include a chapter on reading development (Kamhi & Catts, 1989). We remedied this omission in the new version of our book that came out this past fall (Catts & Kamhi, 1999). In this brief article, I will present some excerpts from the chapter on reading development that deals with the development of proficient word recognition skills. The chapter also includes a section on the development of reading comprehension that will not be addressed in this article. After presenting a relatively new theory of reading development (the self-teaching hypothesis), I discuss some implications of this view for assessing and treating children with reading disabilities.
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