Combining Training in Speech-Language Pathology and Written Language: An Integrated Curriculum One of ASHA’s challenges in the 21st century is to define the role of speechlanguage pathologists in the area of reading (Butler, 1996). It is our position that the speech-language pathologist, properly trained, can play a central role in diagnosing and treating disorders of written language. This position led ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
Combining Training in Speech-Language Pathology and Written Language: An Integrated Curriculum
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles Haynes
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Pamela Hook
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
Combining Training in Speech-Language Pathology and Written Language: An Integrated Curriculum
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 30-33. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.30
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 30-33. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.30
One of ASHA’s challenges in the 21st century is to define the role of speechlanguage pathologists in the area of reading (Butler, 1996). It is our position that the speech-language pathologist, properly trained, can play a central role in diagnosing and treating disorders of written language. This position led us to develop a graduate curriculum in which spoken and written language instruction are systematically integrated. Six of our core courses directly address the normal development and disorders of both spoken and written language as well as diagnostic and/or remedial issues. In addition to practicum experiences in spoken language, all of our students participate in an in-house practicum in written language. Both the theoretical and practical components stress training in phonological awareness and multisensory structured language techniques for teaching reading and writing. This unitary curriculum, accredited by ASHA and certified by the Massachusetts Department of Education, provides the option of dual certification in speech-language-hearing and in reading. This article summarizes why speechlanguage pathologists should be concerned with written language and provides a model for how spoken and written language course work and clinical practica can be integrated in a 2-year graduate program in speech-language pathology.
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