Innovative Models Of Phonological Awareness Education In University Program Curricula The following articles are a synopsis of a seminar sponsored by Divisions 1 and 10 (Issues in Higher Education) at the ASHA Convention, November 20, 1998, in San Antonio, Texas. Over the past decade, our profession has become increasingly involved in issues regarding written language (ASHA, 1991). At the ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
Innovative Models Of Phonological Awareness Education In University Program Curricula
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen Whitmire
    The College of Saint Rose, Albany, NY
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
Innovative Models Of Phonological Awareness Education In University Program Curricula
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 29. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.29
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 29. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.29
The following articles are a synopsis of a seminar sponsored by Divisions 1 and 10 (Issues in Higher Education) at the ASHA Convention, November 20, 1998, in San Antonio, Texas.
Over the past decade, our profession has become increasingly involved in issues regarding written language (ASHA, 1991). At the same time, reading has become redefined as a languagebased skill (Kamhi & Catts, 1999). The convergence of these two trends has placed speechlanguage pathologists within the arena of literacy assessment and intervention. For those speech-language pathologists working with the early childhood population, this requires knowledge of the relationship between language and school readiness skills, including preliteracy skills. When working with the school-aged population, speech-language pathologists must have knowledge of the relationships among comprehension, production, and use of oral language, reading, writing, and spelling (ASHA, 1991). This knowledge is critical for effective intervention, as children and adolescents with developmental language impairments are at a particularly high risk for academic failure. In fact, most students with language impairments experience significant difficulties learning to read (Catts, 1991). The sources of reading difficulties have been most consistently identified as deficits in phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and word recognition (Catts, 1996; Torgeson, 1999).
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