The Promise and Limits of Phonological Training for Children with Specific Reading Disabilities Why is the training of phonological processes for children with specific reading disabilities (SRD) still such an important, yet controversial, focus of research? Why do some professionals sing its praises, while others shout that it is overemphasized and unnecessary? Why so much emotion over the importance of phonemes, little ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1999
The Promise and Limits of Phonological Training for Children with Specific Reading Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara W. Wise
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1999
The Promise and Limits of Phonological Training for Children with Specific Reading Disabilities
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 22-25. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.22
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, May 1999, Vol. 6, 22-25. doi:10.1044/lle6.1.22
Why is the training of phonological processes for children with specific reading disabilities (SRD) still such an important, yet controversial, focus of research? Why do some professionals sing its praises, while others shout that it is overemphasized and unnecessary? Why so much emotion over the importance of phonemes, little units of speech sounds? This article looks into theory and research and considers what both suggest about the promise and the limits of phonological training for children with SRD.
The promise of phonological training stems from fairly common professional knowledge that the primary deficit in most cases of SRD is in phonological processes (see Lyon, 1995; Wise 1991). That the deficit is unique, causal, and has neuropsychological, behavioral, and genetic underpinnings is backed by about 25 years of research (see above, and Hynd &: Hiemenz, 1997; Olson, Forsberg, & Wise 1994; Shaywitz, 1996). The controversy over the value of phonological training endures in part because some researchers have recently been so optimistic. They proposed that since phonological awareness (analyzing sounds within spoken syllables) and phonological decoding (translating print into sound) constitute the primary underlying deficit in SRD, then phonological training should by itself lead to fluent and accurate independent reading (see Share, 1995).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.