Back at the Elephant’s Side With Our Blinders Off Thankfully, over the past few years graduate students and young clients have compelled me to learn as much as I could about developmental apraxia of speech (DAS). Without their influence, it would have been an easy topic to wish to avoid; after all, DAS is referred to by several ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Back at the Elephant’s Side With Our Blinders Off
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca J. McCauley
    Department of Communication Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Back at the Elephant’s Side With Our Blinders Off
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1998, Vol. 5, 3-4. doi:10.1044/lle5.2.3
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1998, Vol. 5, 3-4. doi:10.1044/lle5.2.3
Thankfully, over the past few years graduate students and young clients have compelled me to learn as much as I could about developmental apraxia of speech (DAS). Without their influence, it would have been an easy topic to wish to avoid; after all, DAS is referred to by several names, is hard to define, and, perhaps, harder to treat. However, students and clients have helped me decide to look into the literature on DAS by making it clear that individuals with DAS and their families need guidance about how to understand and deal with this frustrating problem now. They can’t wait until we understand everything for us to develop some starting points.
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