Treatment of Developmental Apraxia of Speech: Application of Motor Learning Principles Motor speech disorders in children encompass a range of processing deficits that may include motor planning and motor programming, as well as motor execution (See Caruso & Strand, in press; Hodge, 1994; Kent, Adams & Turner, 1996; Levelt 1989; Van der Merwe, 1997  for discussions of models that describe ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Treatment of Developmental Apraxia of Speech: Application of Motor Learning Principles
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edythe A. Strand
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences The University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Treatment of Developmental Apraxia of Speech: Application of Motor Learning Principles
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1998, Vol. 5, 16-21. doi:10.1044/lle5.2.16
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 1998, Vol. 5, 16-21. doi:10.1044/lle5.2.16
Motor speech disorders in children encompass a range of processing deficits that may include motor planning and motor programming, as well as motor execution (See Caruso & Strand, in press; Hodge, 1994; Kent, Adams & Turner, 1996; Levelt 1989; Van der Merwe, 1997  for discussions of models that describe these processes). Because motor processing interacts with cognitive and linguistic processing, especially in acquisition (Strand, 1992), the assessment and treatment of developmental speech disorders is complicated. This article will focus on treatment strategies for addressing the motor planning and programming impairment posited by many to be at least partially responsible for the articulatory impairment seen in developmental apraxia of speech (e.g., Hall, 1992; Hall, Jordan & Robin, 1993; Crary, 1993). A brief description of a few of the basic principles of motor learning will be reviewed followed by examples of treatment techniques that have been suggested for DAOS. Emphasis will be placed on how the principles of motor learning are represented in these approaches, or how they could be enhanced. The major purpose of this article is to argue that these principles be considered when planning treatment for children with severe speech disorders and incorporated when there is any indication that impaired motor skill may be contributing to the child’s speech disorder.
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