Mother-Infant Communication Patterns: Teen Parents and Their Children Certain elements of mother-infant interactions are essential to nurturing communicative development in the infant (e.g., Owens, 1992; Snow, Dubber, & DeBlauw, 1982). The mother is often the main source of interactions in early development, and it is important that interactions between the mother and her infant support the speech ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1997
Mother-Infant Communication Patterns: Teen Parents and Their Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy L. Coufal
    University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • Deborah Masters
    University of Nebraska at Omaha
    graduate student
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 1997
Mother-Infant Communication Patterns: Teen Parents and Their Children
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, April 1997, Vol. 4, 34-39. doi:10.1044/lle4.1.34
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, April 1997, Vol. 4, 34-39. doi:10.1044/lle4.1.34
Certain elements of mother-infant interactions are essential to nurturing communicative development in the infant (e.g., Owens, 1992; Snow, Dubber, & DeBlauw, 1982). The mother is often the main source of interactions in early development, and it is important that interactions between the mother and her infant support the speech and language development of the infant. If certain characteristics of traditional mother-infant interactions have a critical impact on their children’s communicative development, it is important to look at those same characteristics in nontraditional mother-infant interactions (e.g., teen parents). When those elements necessary to the speech and language development of the infant are not seen in nontraditional parenting situations, the development of the infant may be affected and perhaps compromised. Children of teen parents are also vulnerable to several biological and environmental risk factors (Ensher & Clark, 1986; Raver, 1991). Communication development may be impacted as a result of the combination of nontraditional parent-child interactions and these risk factors.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.