Multidomain Analysis of a Small Cerebral Infarct: Two Case Studies of Consistency and Variability in Real-Time Speech Production “My articulation&is no longer automatic but has to be commanded, directed. I have to think of the word I am going to utter, and of the way in which to utter it (Alajouanine, Pichot, & Durant, 1949, in Lecours & Lhermitte, 1976, p. 93). This excerpt is from a ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1997
Multidomain Analysis of a Small Cerebral Infarct: Two Case Studies of Consistency and Variability in Real-Time Speech Production
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Scott L. Silliman
    Department of Neurology University of Florida Health Science Center, Jacksonville, FL
  • Elaine R. Silliman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Ruth Huntley-Bahr
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Susan Donald
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 1997
Multidomain Analysis of a Small Cerebral Infarct: Two Case Studies of Consistency and Variability in Real-Time Speech Production
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, April 1997, Vol. 4, 24-32. doi:10.1044/lle4.1.24
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, April 1997, Vol. 4, 24-32. doi:10.1044/lle4.1.24
“My articulation&is no longer automatic but has to be commanded, directed. I have to think of the word I am going to utter, and of the way in which to utter it (Alajouanine, Pichot, & Durant, 1949, in Lecours & Lhermitte, 1976, p. 93).
This excerpt is from a letter written in 1949 by a 63-year-old male to his physicians. His case, reported before the availability of neuroimaging, represents one of the few documented instances over time of a rare neurological event, a discrete lesion of the left inferior precentral gyrus resulting from an ischemic stroke. He had undisturbed language comprehension and expression, but significant disruption of prosody and articulation, what might be variously called Broca’s aphasia, dysarthria, apraxia, aphemia, phonetic disintegration, pure anarthria, or, even, foreign accent syndrome (Basso, Taborelli, & Vignolo, 1978; Blumstein, Alexander, Ryalls, Katz, & Dworetzky, 1987; Moen, 1990; Schiff, Alexander, Naeser, & Galaburda, 1983).
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