Introduction: Literacy Problems in Children With Severe Speech Sound Disorders, Including CAS Any speech-language pathologist who has worked with the parents of a child with a severe speech sound disorder (severe SSD) can anticipate some of the questions they may ask about their child’s future. “When will my child’s speech be understandable to his grandparents, to other children, to strangers?” “What can ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Introduction: Literacy Problems in Children With Severe Speech Sound Disorders, Including CAS
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca McCauley
    Communication Sciences Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
  • Edythe Strand
    Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Introduction: Literacy Problems in Children With Severe Speech Sound Disorders, Including CAS
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2007, Vol. 14, 3-4. doi:10.1044/lle14.3.3
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2007, Vol. 14, 3-4. doi:10.1044/lle14.3.3
Any speech-language pathologist who has worked with the parents of a child with a severe speech sound disorder (severe SSD) can anticipate some of the questions they may ask about their child’s future. “When will my child’s speech be understandable to his grandparents, to other children, to strangers?” “What can we do to help?” “How will he do in school?” Often, the last of these questions is actually a complex question about the child’s future as a reader, writer, and speller. It can be a particularly difficult one to answer.
Until recently, trying to respond to questions about the future literacy of a child with severe SSD— especially the small subgroup of these children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS)—has proven exceedingly difficult for several reasons. First, many of us do not have the amount or length of clinical experience with these children that could help guide us. We may see such children intensively when they are younger, but lose track of their progress after they leave our caseload. Consequently, we do not know about their long-term outcomes firsthand. Second, until recently, research in this area has been sorely lacking, meaning that the research arm of evidence-based practice had little to offer us.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.