Literacy Problems Associated With Childhood Apraxia of Speech Children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) present with a severe speech sound disorder that manifests itself early in speech sound development and often persists into adolescence and beyond. The developmental trajectory of speech, language, and literacy development in children with CAS is not well charted. However, most studies report ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Literacy Problems Associated With Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Lewis
    Department of Pediatrics School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Barbara L. Ekelman
    Department of Pediatrics School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Literacy Problems Associated With Childhood Apraxia of Speech
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2007, Vol. 14, 10-17. doi:10.1044/lle14.3.10
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2007, Vol. 14, 10-17. doi:10.1044/lle14.3.10
Children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) present with a severe speech sound disorder that manifests itself early in speech sound development and often persists into adolescence and beyond. The developmental trajectory of speech, language, and literacy development in children with CAS is not well charted. However, most studies report a long course of therapy, typically spanning 9 years or more (Aram, 1984; Blakely, 1983; Hall, Hardy, & La Velle, 1990) with some normalization of speech sounds occurring (Shriberg, Austin, Lewis, McSweeny, & Wilson, 1997a). Although co-morbid disorders of language impairment (LI), reading disorders (RD), and spelling difficulties are often observed clinically in children with CAS, few reports exist on the literacy problems associated with CAS. The goals of this paper are (a) to review what is known about literacy outcomes of children with speech sound disorders (SSD) in general and specifically CAS, (b) to consider hypotheses regarding the etiological basis for poor literacy outcomes in CAS, especially the genetic basis, and (c) to suggest clinical implications for the development of literacy skills in children with CAS.
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