Evidence-Based Phonological Assessment of Bilingual Children There is little research available in the field of speech-language pathology that describes evidence-based practice for treating bilingual children. There is a paucity of information describing how typically developing phonological systems function in bilinguals, let alone disordered systems. Knowledge of phonological representation in bilinguals informs our understanding of the typically ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Phonological Assessment of Bilingual Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leah C. Fabiano
    Center for Research in Language University of California San Diego and San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   July 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Phonological Assessment of Bilingual Children
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2007, Vol. 14, 22-24. doi:10.1044/lle14.2.22
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2007, Vol. 14, 22-24. doi:10.1044/lle14.2.22
There is little research available in the field of speech-language pathology that describes evidence-based practice for treating bilingual children. There is a paucity of information describing how typically developing phonological systems function in bilinguals, let alone disordered systems. Knowledge of phonological representation in bilinguals informs our understanding of the typically developing bilingual child’s phonological system. With this knowledge, speech-language pathologists are better able to differentiate phonological difference from phonological disorder. The purpose of this article is to provide a step-by-step plan for phonological assessment of bilingual children.
Theories of phonological representation (see Goldstein & Gildersleeve-Neumann, 2007) can be linked to current assessment practices in the field of speech-language pathology. The following assessment strategies are currently best practice procedures based on the research available in this little-studied area of the field. Using the theoretical rationale that bilingual children maintain separation for some phonological elements while demonstrating interaction on others, the following protocol for bilingual phonological assessment was developed. This evidence-based assessment is detailed in a step-by-step format.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.