Typical Phonological Acquisition in Bilinguals Differentially diagnosing phonological disorders in bilingual children is difficult for a variety of reasons. Chief among them is the lack of widespread knowledge of typical phonological development. This lack of knowledge often results in either over-diagnosis (i.e., marking expected or typical patterns as disordered) or under-diagnosis (i.e., marking disordered patterns ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2007
Typical Phonological Acquisition in Bilinguals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian Goldstein
    Department of Communication Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Christina Gildersleeve-Neumann
    Department of Slpeech and Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, OR
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2007
Typical Phonological Acquisition in Bilinguals
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2007, Vol. 14, 11-16. doi:10.1044/lle14.2.11
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, July 2007, Vol. 14, 11-16. doi:10.1044/lle14.2.11
Differentially diagnosing phonological disorders in bilingual children is difficult for a variety of reasons. Chief among them is the lack of widespread knowledge of typical phonological development. This lack of knowledge often results in either over-diagnosis (i.e., marking expected or typical patterns as disordered) or under-diagnosis (i.e., marking disordered patterns as expected or typical).
This situation places bilingual children at risk for not receiving the valid services they require. That is, if they are over-diagnosed, then they will be receiving services for a disorder that they truly do not have. On the other hand, if they are under-diagnosed, then they will not be receiving needed services for a true phonological disorder. In order to decrease the possibility of either over-diagnosis or under-diagnosis, we present information on typical phonological acquisition in bilingual speakers. In doing so, we will briefly describe a model of bilingual phonological representation, data on phonological acquisition in bilinguals, and implications for phonological disorders.
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